General Information

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August 2015
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. Colloquium

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

2

  1. Summer Sunday

    10 am, Berkner Hall

  2. Science Talk

    11 am, Physics Bldg

3

  1. Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    10 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    The ORANGE (OR) protein regulates carotenoid accumulation and plastid development. Our work showed that OR is dually targeted to the nucleus and the chloroplasts. The expression level of Or regulates transcript abundances of genes for carotenoid and chlorophyll metabolism and accumulation in etiolated cotyledons. We demonstrated that OR physically interacts with a bHLH transcription factor, TCP14, which binds directly to promoter regions of its target genes, such as CAB4, ELIP1 and AtOr itself. OR-regulated gene expression relies on TCP14. Taken together, we proved that OR regulates etioplast development via its physical and genetic interactions with TCP14.

4

  1. No events scheduled

5

  1. NSLS-ll Town Meeting

    1 pm, Building 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: NSLS-ll Users' Executive Committee

    The NSLS-II staff and user community are invited to a Town Meeting on Wednesday, August 5, from 1-3 p.m. in building 703, Large Conference Room. Watch webcast starting at 1 p.m. http://www.bnl.gov/video/

  2. HET/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

    Higgs coupling measurements can shed light on the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. However it is not trivial to go beyond generic intuitions, such as the expectation that natural theories generate large deviations, and make precise statements. In this talk I will show in a model independent way that measuring deviations at the LHC implies the existence of new bosons between a few TeV and a few hundred TeV. This is true in general, including theories where new fermions produce the deviations.

6

  1. No events scheduled

7

  1. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Linda Bowerman

    2015 Goldhaber Award Seminar and Lunch Reception

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

8

  1. No events scheduled

9

  1. No events scheduled

10

  1. No events scheduled

11

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    2 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735, Conference Rm. A - 1st fl.

    Hosted by: Mingzhao Liu

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Photoresponses in Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires Prof. Hanwei Gao Department of Physics, Florida State University Tuesday, August 11, 2015 2:00 p.m. Bldg. 735 " Conf. Rm. A, 1st floor Abstract: Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has drawn much attention for its unique metal-insulator transition near the room temperature. The high electrical resistivity below the transition temperature (about 64 °C) is a result of the strong electron-electron correlation. Such interactions can potentially lead to remarkable charge carrier multiplication under optical excitation, a process desirable for efficient optoelectronics and photovoltaics. However, because the resistivity is highly temperature-dependent, the observed light-induced conductivity in VO2 was often attributed to photothermal effects. By varying the chopping frequency of the optical illumination, we have distinguished the photothermal and photoconductive effects in VO2 nanowires. The frequency dependent measurements indicated that the relatively slow photothermal processes can be well suppressed with high chopping frequency, whereas the fast photo-excitation of charge carrier results in a frequency-independent photoconductivity in VO2. Resolving these coexisting processes paves the way for further studies of carrier dynamics under optical excitations in strong electron correlated materials. . Host: Mingzhao Liu Joann Tesoriero Center for Functional Nanomaterials P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973 Tel. (631) 344-7791 Tax: (631) 344-3093 Tesoriero@bnl.gov

  2. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

    After 10 years of research in High Energy Theory this BNL graduate ('83-'85 and '88-'93) followed the call of Wall Street. In my talk I reflect on over 20 years in the financial industry with an emphasis on highlighting possible career choices for young people that might one day be faced with searching for a "life after Physics". Along the way I also hope to leave the audience with an understanding of some basic facts about Finance and an appreciation for the utility of the physicist's toolkit in the "real world". *This talk may be of especial interest to students.

12

  1. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

13

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    "Hypothesis testing is arguably the most common and elementary task in information processing (e.g., we constantly make decisions based on incomplete information). Its quantum version, quantum state discrimination, is likewise central in quantum information processing. The talk gives an introduction to the topic, focussing on discrimination of a large amount of identically prepared systems. In this limit, a powerful bound on the error rate can be derived. In classical statistics this is know as Chernoff bound. The quantum version of the Chernoff bound will be presented and discussed."

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worchester

    LHCb has presented groundbreaking new results this summer in exotic particle spectroscopy and searches for new physics.

14

  1. Chemistry Department Colloquium

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Etsuko Fujita

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    I will discuss high energy collisions of dilute on dense systems (pA) and review some ideas about initial-state induced correlations.

15

  1. No events scheduled

16

  1. No events scheduled

17

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    2 pm, Room 300, 3rd Floor, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    With the tremendous development of renewable energies such as solar and wind powers, the smooth integration of their energies into the grid, thus improving the grid reliability and utilization, critically needs large-scale energy storage systems with long-life, high efficiency, high safety and low cost. Among the various energy storage technologies, electrochemical approach represents one of the most promising means to store the electricity in large-scale because of the flexibility, high energy conversion efficiency and simple maintenance. Due to the highest energy density among practical rechargeable batteries, lithium-ion batteries have been widely used in the portable electronic devices and would undoubtedly be the best choice for the electric vehicles. However, the rarity and non-uniform distribution of lithium in the Earth's crust may limit their large-scale application in renewable energy. In this regard, room-temperature sodium-ion batteries with lower energy density compared with lithium-ion batteries have been reconsidered particularly for such large-scale applications, where cycle life and cost are more essential factors than energy density owing to the abundant sodium resources (2.75%) and potentially low cost as well as similar "rocking-chair" sodium storage mechanism as lithium. In this presentation, I will present several layer- and tunnel-type transition metal oxide electrodes for room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries. In the case of layer-type metal oxides, based on our new significant finding of highly electrochemical reversibility of Cu2+/Cu3+ redox couple in Na-containing layered oxides, I will emphasize our recent work on a series of air-stable and Co/Ni-free layered metal oxide cathodes which exhibit superior Na storage performance. The prototype sodium-ion batteries constructed from our developed cathode and anode materials will also be demonstrated. Furthermore, we recently propose a new strategy t

18

  1. Computational Science Center Seminar

    10:30 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Support of high performance queries and analytics on large volumes of spatial data becomes increasingly important in many application domains, including geospatial problems and emerging scientific applications such as pathology imaging. There are two major challenges for managing and querying massive spatial data: the explosion of spatial data, and the high computational complexity of spatial queries due to its multi-dimensional nature. Our goal is to develop a general framework to support high performance spatial queries and analytics for spatial big data on MapReduce and CPU-GPU hybrid platforms. In this talk, I will present a scalable and high performance spatial data warehousing system Hadoop-GIS for running large scale spatial queries on Hadoop and Spark. Hadoop-GIS achieves scalable and efficient queries through optimized spatial partitioning, multi-level indexing, customizable spatial query engine RESQUE and implicit parallel spatial query execution. I will introduce applications of the system to support pathology imaging analytics and social media analytics.

19

  1. No events scheduled

20

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    The search for Axions, a particle theorized to explain the lack of CP violation in strong physics and suspected to contribute if not explain galactic dark matter, has lead to ever-sensitive techniques to study induced vacuum birefringence. What remains an issue: many of the measurable parameters that could give evidence for this illusive particle scale with the square of the birefringent angle (proportional to the photon-axion coupling constant). This talk will look at new techniques that can generate measurables that scale linearly (first order) with an induced birefringence. This has the potential to extend significantly the range through which cavity experiments can probe the vacuum of space in performing searches for axions and other exotic particles.

21

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, first fl. conference room A

    Hosted by: Anibal Boscoboinik

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Caught in the Act! Live Observations of Catalysts Using High-pressure Scanning Probe Microscopy Irene M. N. Groot Leiden Institute of Physics and Leiden Institute of Chemistry, the Netherlands Friday, August 21, 2015 10:00 am Bldg. 735 " Conf. Rm. A Recently it has become clear that essential differences can exist between the behavior of catalysts under industrial conditions (high pressure and temperature) and the (ultra) high vacuum conditions of traditional laboratory experiments. Differences in structure, composition, reaction mechanism, activity, and selectivity have been observed. These observations indicated the presence of the so-called pressure gap, and made it clear that meaningful results can only be obtained at high pressures and temperatures. However, most of the techniques traditionally used to study catalysts and their reactions were designed to operate under (ultra) high vacuum conditions. To bridge the pressure gap, the last years have seen a tremendous effort in designing new instruments and adapting existing ones to be able to investigate catalysts in situ under industrially relevant conditions. This talk focuses on the development of scanning probe microscopy for operando observations of active model catalysts. In our group, we have developed set-ups that combine an ultrahigh vacuum environment for model catalyst preparation and characterization with a high-pressure flow reactor cell, integrated with either a scanning tunneling microscope or an atomic force microscope. With these set-ups we are able to perform atomic-scale investigations of well-defined model catalysts under industrial conditions. Additionally, we combine the structural information from scanning probe microscopy with time-resolved mass spectrometry measurements on the gas mixture that leaves the re

22

  1. No events scheduled

23

  1. No events scheduled

24

  1. Special Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Recent efforts to investigate the thermodynamics of lattice QCD with N_f=2+1+1 fermion degrees of freedom at realistic strange and charm quark masses and at various up and down quark mass values within the framework of Wilson twisted mass fermion discretization are discussed. Comparing with recently published results in the N_f=2 case we are going to present results for the pseudo-critical temperature and preliminary results on the way to the thermodynamic equation of state. Moreover, we would like to discuss various methods to determine the topological susceptibility as a function of the temperature.

25

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Oleg Eyser

    Recent advances in theory have shown that it is possible to directly calculate the canonical quark and gluon orbital angular momentum contributions to the proton spin in lattice QCD. When boosted to the infinite momentum frame, the quark and gluon orbital angular momentum operators defined in the gauge-invariant nucleon spin sum rule of X. S. Chen et al. are the same as those derived from generalized transverse momentum distributions. The latter reduce to the canonical orbital angular momenta in the light-cone gauge, and can be measured in high-energy scattering experiments. I will show that these orbital angular momentum operators can be defined locally, and discuss the strategies of calculating their matrix elements in lattice QCD.

26

  1. HET/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. AUG

    28

    Friday

    Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Friday, August 28, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Chang-Jun Liu

    Mutations in TRPP2 and PKD1 account for almost all clinically identified cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), one of the most common human genetic diseases. TRPP2 and PKD1 form a receptor-ion channel complex on primary cilia and couple extracellular stimuli to cellular responses in renal cells. We found that this complex contains three TRPP2 subunits and one PKD1 subunit, and this 3:1 stoichiometry is determined by a coiled-coil domain on the C-terminus of TRPP2. Our data also suggested that PKD proteins may be involved in channel pore-forming, in addition to signal reception. Furthermore, by generating a gain-of-function TRPP2 mutant, we investigated the functional property of TRPP2, which was largely unknown due to the lack of the knowledge on the activation mechanism of this ion channel.

29

  1. No events scheduled

30

  1. No events scheduled

31

  1. No events scheduled

  1. AUG

    28

    Friday

    Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    "Molecular Mechanism of the Assembly of PKD1/TRPP2 Receptor-Ion Channel Complex, the Cellular Sensor in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease"

    Presented by Yong Yu, Department of Biological Sciences, St. John's University, Queens, NY

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Friday, August 28, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Chang-Jun Liu

    Mutations in TRPP2 and PKD1 account for almost all clinically identified cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), one of the most common human genetic diseases. TRPP2 and PKD1 form a receptor-ion channel complex on primary cilia and couple extracellular stimuli to cellular responses in renal cells. We found that this complex contains three TRPP2 subunits and one PKD1 subunit, and this 3:1 stoichiometry is determined by a coiled-coil domain on the C-terminus of TRPP2. Our data also suggested that PKD proteins may be involved in channel pore-forming, in addition to signal reception. Furthermore, by generating a gain-of-function TRPP2 mutant, we investigated the functional property of TRPP2, which was largely unknown due to the lack of the knowledge on the activation mechanism of this ion channel.

  2. SEP

    3

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Analytic solution of the Boltzmann equation in the early universe"

    Presented by Jorge Noronha, University of Sao Paulo

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, September 3, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    A general method for exactly computing the nonlinear collision term of the Boltzmann equation for a massless relativistic gas in a homogeneous and isotropic spacetime is presented. This approach is used to find an exact analytical solution of the nonlinear relativistic Boltzmann equation in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. This solution can be used to investigate analytically the interplay between global expansion and local thermalization in rapidly evolving systems.

  3. SEP

    4

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Asymptotic freedom of gluons in the Fock space"

    Presented by Stanislaw Glazek, University of Warsaw

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 4, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Asymptotic freedom of gluons is defined in terms of scale-dependent renormalized QCD Hamiltonian operators that act in the Fock space. These operators are calculable in a new way [1,2], by solving a double-commutator differential equation [3], where the derivative is with respect to a scale parameter defined within the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP). The RGPEP equation and its solutions are invariant with respect to boosts and may serve as a tool in attempts to dynamically explain the parton and constituent models of hadrons in QCD. The third-order QCD solution of the RGPEP equation to be discussed [2], provides an explicit example of how asymptotic freedom of gluons is exhibited in the scale-dependence of Hamiltonians as operators in the Fock space. This example also prepares ground for the fourth-order calculations of effective strong interactions using the same RGPEP equation [3], to facilitate Hamiltonian studies of many strong-interaction processes, e.g., those that involve heavy quarkonia in relativistic motion. Applications to other sectors of the Standard Model than the strong interactions await development, while only preliminary results are currently available in the domain of precise calculations in QED[4]. [1] Dynamics of effective gluons, S. D. Glazek, Phys. Rev. D63, 116006, 29p (2001). [2] Asymptotic freedom in the front-form Hamiltonian for gluons, M. Gomez-Rocha, S. D. Glazek, arXiv:1505.06688 [hep-ph], to appear in Phys. Rev. D. [3] Perturbative formulae for relativistic interactions of effective particles, S. D. Glazek, Acta Phys. Pol. B43, 1843, 20p (2012). [4] Calculation of size for bound-state constituent

  4. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Chemistry Department Seminar

    ""Tracking atoms and charges in metal catalysts under reaction conditions"

    Presented by Anatoly I. Frenkel, Physics Dept, Yeshiva University, NY

    10 am, Room 300, 3rd Floor, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Alex Harris

    In the last decade, complexity of catalytic nanoparticles attracted much attention as a major factor in catalytic processes. Atomic and electronic structure and dynamics of particles, as well as their interactions with support and adsorbates, are important descriptors of their catalytic activity. The main challenge is how to investigate these factors in a working catalyst, at high temperature and pressure, and how to do so without breaking the correlations between components of this complex system. I will give a brief overview of new methods developed recently to enable such combined studies under realistic reaction conditions. Our approach is to single out electronic charge of metal atoms in a cluster as an "observable" quantity and develop methods to "observe" it experimentally under realistic reaction conditions, and model theoretically. In this framework, complex interactions between metal and adsorbates, metal and support, and support and adsorbates can be all accounted for in terms of their effects on the cluster charge. I will review recent results utilizing this approach for a prototypical catalyst, 1nm Pt nanoparticles supported on silica. Using high energy resolution methods of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies (HERFD and RIXS), as well as in situ IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and electron microscopy, aided with first-principles (DFT) modeling, we deduced that the structure of atoms and charges in the catalyst is strongly heterogeneous and that it changes dynamically with the change in temperature and pressure of adsorbates (H2 or CO).

  5. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Joint Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics Seminar

    "Understanding the nature of neutrinos via neutrinoless double-beta decay"

    Presented by Wenqin Xu, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Neutrinos provide a critical portal to physics beyond the Standard Model, yet the nature of neutrinos is largely unknown, including the neutrino mass hierarcy and if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Majorana particles are fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and would pave the way to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized process where two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons simultaneously without emitting neutrinos. It is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it is the only feasible way to experimentally establish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The observation of 0 decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. After decades of experimental e orts, the next generation 0 decay experiments will have a signi cant discovery potential to observe 0 decay, if neutrinos are indeed Majorana particles. In this talk, we will discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and review the experiments searching for it. We will focus on the Majorana Demonstrator, a 40-kg modular Germanium detector array, which searches for 0 decay in 76Ge and aims at demonstrating a path forward to next generation 0 decay experiments.

  6. SEP

    9

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 9, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  7. SEP

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, September 10, 2015, 6:30 pm

  8. SEP

    11

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Strickland, Kent State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 11, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  9. SEP

    16

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  10. SEP

    18

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Alex Kovner, University of Connecticut

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 18, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  11. SEP

    19

    Saturday

    BNL Team at the Port Jeff Dragon Boat Race Festival

    "BERA APAA Event"

    9 am, Port Jefferson Harborfront Park

    Saturday, September 19, 2015, 9:00 am

    The BERA Asian Pacific American Association (APAA) is inviting all members of the Brookhaven Lab community to join them at the the 2015 Port Jefferson Dragon Boat Race Festival on Sept. 19 to cheer the BNL Team. This is the festival's second year, and teams from all over the New York tri-state area will be competing. The BERA/BNL Team is practicing all summer for this race. Come cheer us on! View the event's official web site at http://portjeffdragonracefest.com/

  12. SEP

    23

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  13. SEP

    23

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "507th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Dong Su"

    Presented by Dong Su, Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  14. SEP

    25

    Friday

    ATLAS/HET Joint Lunch Seminar

    "Constraints on New Physics via Higgs Boson Couplings and Invisible Decays with the ATLAS Detector"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, September 25, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  15. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  16. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Enso String Quartet: Salonen, Sibelius"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  17. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "A hundred years of visualizing molecular structure"

    Presented by Professor Venki Ramakrishnan, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, United Kingdom

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    It has been a hundred years since molecules were first visualized directly by using x-ray crystallography. That technique gave us our first look at molecules as simple as common salt to one as complex as the ribosome that has almost a million atoms. In the last few years, electron microscopy has offered an alternative to directly obtaining the structure of very large molecules. I will describe some highlights in this journey with an emphasis on the recent developments in electron microscopy and how it is creating a new range of possibilities for visualizing biological structures.

  18. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for January-April Cycle 2016"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  19. OCT

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Top Quark Precision Physics and the Fate of the Universe"

    Presented by Andreas Jung, Purdue University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 1, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The talk will discuss recent measurements in the top quark sector, the heaviest known elementary particle known so far, performed at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and at the LHC. I will highlight Tevatron results that are competitive to those at the LHC, especially regarding the top quark mass and production asymmetry. The talk will also present CMS results on the top quark mass and Yukawa coupling. I will discuss the implications for the standard model electroweak sector regarding the vacuum stability. I will conclude with an outlook towards the high luminosity phase of the LHC and the CMS silicon detector upgrades required for the high luminosity phase.

  20. OCT

    2

    Friday

    CFN Colloquium

    "In-situ XAS, TXM and RIXS experiments"

    Presented by Frank de Groot, Debye Institute of Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Netherlands

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Friday, October 2, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    New developments in in-situ x-ray absorption (XAS), transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) will be discussed. A brief introduction is given of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, including the multiplet interpretation of XAS spectral shapes [1,2]. Nanoscale chemical imaging of catalysts under working conditions is possible with transmission x-ray microscopy. We have shown that TXM can image a catalytic system under relevant reaction conditions and provides detailed information on the morphology and composition of the catalyst material in situ [3]. The 20 nanometer resolution combined with powerful chemical speciation by XAS and the ability to image materials under reaction conditions opens up new opportunities to study many chemical processes. I will discuss the present status of in-situ TXM, with an emphasis on the abilities of the 10+ nm resolution TXM technique in comparison with 0.1 nm STEM-EELS [4,5]. Hard X-ray TXM allows the measurement of chemical images and tomographs under more realistic conditions, using a capillary reactor at 10 bar Fischer-Tropsch conditions [6]. The second part of the talk deals with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), In 2p3d RIXS one scans through the 2p XAS edge and measures the optical excitation range. As an example, the RIXS spectra of CoO will be discussed. The experimental resolution of 100 meV at ADRESS allows the detailed observation of the electronic structure. First-principle theoretical modelling was performed for the ground state and multiplet analysis for the RIXS experiments. The implications for measurements on coordination compounds (cobalt carboxylates) and cobalt nanoparticles is discussed, in particular the comparison with optical spectroscopy [7]. Related to the RIXS measurements is the analysis of Fluorescence yield (FY) detected x-ray absorption spectra (XAS), including the intrinsic deviations of the FY-XAS spectral shape from

  21. OCT

    7

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Universe or Multiverse?"

    Presented by Andre Linde, Stanford University

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    Cosmological observations show that the universe is very uniform on the maximally large scale accessible to our telescopes. The best theoretical explanation of this uniformity is provided by the inflationary theory. Andrei Linde will briefly describe the status of this theory in view of recent observational data. Rather paradoxically, this theory predicts that on an extremely large scales, much greater than what we can see now, the world may look totally different. Instead of being a single spherically symmetric balloon, our universe may look like a "multiverse," a collection of many different exponentially large balloons ("universes") with different laws of low-energy physics operating in each of them. The new cosmological paradigm, supported by developments in string theory, changes the standard views on the origin and the global structure of the universe and on our own place in the world.

  22. OCT

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, October 8, 2015, 6:30 pm

  23. OCT

    12

    Monday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 12, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  24. OCT

    13

    Tuesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  25. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  26. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    S.C. Planning Federation Workshop

    "2015 Autumn Workshop"

    3 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 3:00 pm

  27. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  28. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Recent Results from the BaBar Experiment"

    Presented by David Norvil Brown, University of Louisville

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    TBD

  29. OCT

    16

    Friday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  30. OCT

    16

    Friday

    HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, HET-BNL

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  31. OCT

    20

    Tuesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sasa Dordevic, University of Akron, Serbia

    1:30 pm, Building 734, Room 201

    Tuesday, October 20, 2015, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Cedomir Petrovic

  32. OCT

    21

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "508th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Dennis Perpelitsa"

    Presented by Dennis Perpelitsa, Physics Department at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  33. OCT

    28

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Xiaohui Liu, University of Maryland

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  34. OCT

    30

    Friday

    HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Eleni Vryonidou, UCL-Belgium

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, October 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  35. NOV

    6

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Linearly resummed hydrodynamics from gravity"

    Presented by Yanyan Bu, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, November 6, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Using fluid/gravity correspondence, we study all-order resummed hydrodynamics in a weakly curved spacetime. The underlying microscopic theory is a finite temperature \mathcal{N}=4 super-Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling. To linear order in the amplitude of hydrodynamic variables and metric perturbations, the fluid's stress-energy tensor is computed with derivatives of both the fluid velocity and background metric resummed to all orders. In addition to two viscosity functions, we find four curvature induced structures coupled to the fluid via new transport coefficient functions, which were referred to as gravitational susceptibilities of the fluid (GSF). We analytically compute these coefficients in the hydrodynamic limit, and then numerically up to large values of momenta. We extensively discuss the meaning of all order hydrodynamics by expressing it in terms of the memory function formalism, which is also suitable for practical simulations. We also consider Gauss-Bonnet correction in the dual gravity, which is equivalent to some 1/N corrections in the dual CFT. To leading order in the Gauss-Bonnet coupling, we find that the memory function is still vanishing.

  36. NOV

    18

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "509th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Wah-Keat Lee"

    Presented by Wah-Keat Lee, National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, November 18, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  37. DEC

    16

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "510th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Yonggang Cui"

    Presented by Yonggang Cui, Nonproliferation & National Security Department at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, December 16, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  38. DEC

    17

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for Higgs Bosons produced in association with top quarks with the ATLAS detector"

    Presented by Professor Vivek Jain, SUNY Albany

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 17, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    Due to the large measured mass of the top quark, the Yukawa coupling of the top quark (yt) is much stronger than that of other quarks. The observation of the t¯tH production mode would allow for a direct measurement of this coupling, to which other Higgs production modes are only sensitive via loop effects. Since yt is expected to be close to unity, it is also argued to be the quantity that might give insight into the scale of new physics. Using various Higgs decay modes, we report on the status of this search using data collected with the ATLAS detector at 7 and 8 TeV collision energies.